Category Archives: Fiction

Therapy For Fictional Characters

Therapy For Fictional Characters (1)

The personalities that carry out your plot have lives. They have inner monologues that nag their waking moments. They suffer headaches making it hard to concentrate. They have fears.

As complex as we all are, so are your characters.

Convincing fiction comes from convincing characters. When you know what your character knows, describing their reactions becomes natural and your characters comes to life.

What do you suppose this fellow is feeling?

There he is, sitting on a wooden bench outside the hardware store with a stripp

Is he afraid, anxious, expectant, or excited?

Knowing helps you create believable characters, and put readers in the front seat to watch the story unfold.

6 Things Every Character (And Writer) Should Know

1 book numbersWhat’s their baggage?

We all have childhood stories that linger into our daily lives. The fear of spiders because your older sister was intent on torturing you, or perhaps a fear of heights because you fell out of a tree. Think about the micro-moments that make up your personal history. Your characters have similar tales. You don’t have to write a term paper on their background, but knowing a few key turning points in their life will add purpose to their role in your plot.

2 book numbersWhat do they like about themselves?

Even the worst villains have redeeming qualities, something that gives them confidence. Your hero also has something about themselves that gives them pride, or even shame. Is this a good thing or a bad thing? Defining this for your main characters could make for an interesting twist in your story as either a heroic save or an epic fail.What if a minor character had a fallible trait that affected your main character? Does that create a ripple effect of events?

3 book numbersWhat frightens them?

Periodically, I have a dream about being swallowed up by the ocean… only the ocean is lapping at my house 120 miles from the coast. Pretty unsettling. I’ve learned to turn it around and go for a swim. But how does your main character overcome fear? How does it limit them or manifest itself in other parts of their lives? The raw emotion that spills out is too intense for an inner critic to stop or censor. Everybody is afraid of something, so are the people populating your novel. Thanks to my sister, I’m afraid of spiders….. even the tiny ones. (Thanks Lynn.) Write your fears into the character’s lives and let them go about finding a way to cope or react. You may be surprised by what they do.

4 book numbersHow far are your characters willing to go to get what they want?

Steal? Lie? Murder? How badly to they want this thing they think they need? The more tense your story and the more intense your character, the further they will push to reach their goal. Everyone has a line they won’t cross, where does your character draw the line? Is it at a crucial point that keeps them from what they’re seeking?

5 book numbersAre they hiding something?

Everybody has a secret. Something in their past they want to forget. Perhaps it’s their true motive they are hiding. Sometimes a small thing can have huge ramifications as it rolls through the plot gathering lies and subterfuge.

6 book numbersWho are their people?

Where did this character come from? What is the culture of their upbringing? Family life? Friends? What are the personality dynamics at play that shape how they interact with everyone whom they come into contact? I think we’re all shaped by our families and extended friends and experiences. Characters have family sidebars that either push them in one direction or pull them into another. That could be a full novel all by itself.

I think this is why series are so much fun. You have multiple books to show the tiny bits that make up a character and begin to build a history through their story. Characters then become familiar to the reader making them feel like friends that are safe and entertaining to spend time with.Jade Weekes

In Wired, Jade Weekes is an art thief, but she never crosses the line of violence – that is,
until she is pushed just enough. Her father’s murder provided a tipping point that makes her rethink the deceptions she weaves so easily. Her past created a plot line for Wired, and the plot of Wired provided a turning point for her character to continue into another story.

A well written book leaves you in a different place than where you started, and characters should grow in a way that allows the reader to feel they’ve taken the journey too.

Making your characters and their actions realistic taps into the readers emotions and keeps them hooked to the last page.

So go on, dig in and see what therapy your characters need to really let readers get to know them.

Thanks for reading,

JPG

Wired Judith GainesWired by Judith Gaines

Jade Weekes emerged from the oily wash of the Seine five years ago with no memory of her life, but an uncanny knowledge of fine art, museum security, and a knack for walking away with priceless treasures. Now she’s tracking an elusive Van Gogh with ties to an underworld struggle that will reveal her forgotten past. 

Words, Wisdom & Ghosts: Writing Advice From The Saturday Club

The Saturday ClubImagine  a gathering of authors who meet merely to exchange ideas, discuss their work, enjoy food, and share a drink.

Imagine these purveyors of words are Ralph Waldo Emerson, Oliver Wendell Holmes and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and that’s just a few of the casual guests at the table.

The Saturday Club was formed in 1855 and held regular meetings at the Parker House Hotel in Boston the last Saturday of each month. The intent was to discuss literature, politics, science and share artistic insights.

Seating Chart for The Saturday Club
Seating Chart for The Saturday Club

When we planned our spring vacation, the Parker House Hotel appealed to us for it’s proximity to Boston’s Freedom Trail and historic sites. My writer indulgent activity was a planned trip to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum for a bit of research. It wasn’t until that evening, that I discovered a framed document and the name Emerson caught my eye, followed by a tally of literary icons. A quick online search of the hotel’s history revealed details of the Saturday Club, a cheeky interview with Mark Twain during a stay at the hotel.

Knock Knock
The door to Charles Dickens’ room is on display in a small basement gallery.

In fact, Charles Dickens is reputed to haunt the the hallways. The elevators have a habit of stopping on the 3rd level, where he stayed, but when the polished bronze doors open no one is there.

As a rational adult, I have to say ghosts are not real. As a writer, I believe in the power of stories which you can also argue are not real.

Did we meet a ghost? My rational mind says, “Coincidence.”

My writer’s minds says, “Holy cow, did you hear that?”

Charles Dickens' Door at the Parker House HotelEncounters

I forced my 10-year to go on a ghost hunt with me. Let’s say she was not very excited at the prospect, but didn’t want to miss the possibility of meeting a real ghost. We started on the 3rd floor, all quiet and normal in every way. We walked to the ends of each hall before returning to the elevators. As we discussed heading to the 12th floor, the most haunted part of the hotel according to the desk clerk, the elevator door opened. It was empty.

“Did you push the button?” she asked.

I had not.

She pushed me towards the stairs., “We have to get out of here, now!”

After some coaxing, I persuaded her to take another elevator car up to the 12th floor. That excursion lasted only a few minutes as she was firmly done with ghost hunting.

A few nights later, I awoke around 5am to the sound of what can only be described as a howl traveling down the hallway and past our door. My first thought was that it was the elevators. We were on the opposite end of the hallway from the elevators. My next thought was that it was a delivery truck outside and I strained to hear the engines idling below. Only we were on the 5th floor and the street traffic was barely audible…. and the street was on the other side of the room.

I’d like to think creativity spews its own kind of energy that lingers in a place. Maybe voices can travel through time. I know I’d like to hear what they would say.

Here’s a free writing excerpt from my journal during our stay. It may be divinely inspired or just too much Boston Cream Pie. You decide.

If there are literary ghosts in this hotel, what would they say?

  • Learn where to put a comma.
  • Put your time to the page.
  • Follow your thoughts.
  • Drink with friends.
  • Have deep conversations.
  • Make light of life, it shouldn’t be heavy.
  • Gather.
  • Let your characters live their own life.
  • Live in the pages.
  • Words have flavors, make your story a full meal.
  • People see what they want to see. Readers read what they expect to read. Try to surprise them.
  • Why are you using long words for short meanings?
  • Can you record intent?

Thanks for hanging out with me. If you’re in Boston, stop by the Parker House for the Boston Cream Pie – they invented the treat and it’s worth the visit. If you’re wondering about the rolls, they invented those too.

And if you see gentle man in a morning coat with a top hat, let the desk clerk know the Mr. Parker is back.

JPG

Wired Judith GainesWired by Judith Gaines

Jade Weekes emerged from the oily wash of the Seine five years ago with no memory of her life, but an uncanny knowledge of fine art, museum security, and a knack for walking away with priceless treasures. Now she’s tracking an elusive Van Gogh with ties to an underworld struggle that will reveal her forgotten past. 

Getting Inside Your Characters

Character ResearchAll writing projects come with some form of research and fiction navigates this pursuit to some interesting destinations. Recently, I spent the day as Jade Weekes, the main character of my art mystery series, crisscrossing The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Becoming your character and looking at the world from their point of view is an easy way to get inside their minds and explore how they think and most importantly, how they react.

How Jade Views Art

Every work of art has multiple layers of history, emotion and humanity. Each artist brings their personal experiences to the canvas, building up layers of paint to capture their thoughts or painstakingly scraping into wood or stone to unveil what only they can see. The next layer is the life of the art work. It passes from creator to patron, to buyer, to museums and thieves – each individual imbuing it with their personal history, continuing a journey of thought as well as emotion.

This is the connection Jade has with Dalì, Mìro and van Gogh. She identifies with their stories as she struggles to paint the picture of her own identity. She looks at a Degas sketch and sees the man not the dancer.

Jade’s Gallery Review

Jumping into Jade’s mindset begins with walking through security. She’s a security expert as well as a thief, and she notices much more than docent wandering galleries or nylon queue barriers organizing visitors.

Jade pays attention to the people around her and looks for groups that offer distraction so she can slip through these barriers unnoticed. She’s aware of the behaviors that attract attention. She knows how to hide her intent. She knows how to look innocent.

Roses, Vincent van Gogh 1890 Once red, the pigment used for these roses faded to a tinged white over time.
Roses, Vincent van Gogh 1890
Once red, the pigment used for these roses faded to a tinged white over time.

A short list of what she looks for?

  • Psychological barriers meant to keep visitors a pre-determined distance from the art. This includes ropes, toe molding, and carpet borders that create a subconscious line not to be crossed.
  • Cameras – specifically, missing cameras. Next she has to verify the void in surveillance or identify if another measure is in place such as sensors attached to paintings. It’s no surprise to her that some galleries are tightly quarantined within small spaces with multiples cameras covering every angle and foot traffic herded in a predetermined pattern. This is where her favorite acquisitions reside.
  • She counts docents and notes how many alcoves and galleries each covers. Jade is a master at body language and knows which are experienced and who can be distracted.

Jade plays scenarios through her mind, timing how long it would take to reach an interior gallery and what obstacles lie between it and a door. The door would not be the main entrance, but a service access, perhaps even the cafeteria. After all, she became good at her job by thinking beyond the moment. Her imagination takes the art all the way to a safe house. If she were setting up the security, the process would be the same – looking for the cracks in the shield.

The Art

I must say, I began to feel a bit paranoid after a while. Eyeing wall hangings and surreptitiously locating security cameras had me playing the “what if” game, constructing micro-plots. Writers see plots and red herrings at every turn.

image
Animated Landscape, Joan Mìro 1927

Joan Mìro is among my favorites at the MET and I spent a great deal of time working out how to get in or close to the gallery with his work. Due to bad timing, the adjoining galleries on both sides were closed off. I managed to get this view from a distance. His dreamscapes are something Jade can understand, as her dreams – filled with grotesque images and mutilated art – play a backdrop to her inner character.

This is the Color of My Dreams, Joan Miro 1925
This is the Color of My Dreams, Joan Miro 1925

If blue is the color of Mìro’s dreams, Jade’s would be the complex hue of the Seine.

 

 

 

image
Bouquet of Sunflowers, Claude Monet 1881

It was Monet’s opinion that his sunflowers were the lesser of van Gogh’s. Jade can visualize how each brings its own qualities of light and color to the flowers. Looking at the ridges of paint building up from a base shade to ever more vibrant hues makes it easy to imagine a hand holding the brush, a frown, and bristles molding the paint like clay to give life and texture to the image.

image
Detail – Bouquet of Sunflowers, Claude Monet 1881

She expresses her emotion through art. Her passion is mirrored in what she pursues. Being in Jade’s thoughts for the day and regarding these works with her perspective launched new ideas for Enigma and more stories beyond that. She sees Gauguin’s passion in the rounded, sensual curves of his work and the frailty of van Gogh’s tree boughs against an open field and senses his unrest.

What are your characters doing? What are their interests? Taking on their viewpoint during a research excursion can bring you closer to their motivations and give you insights on their personality and logical reactions to the events in your story.

Click to enlarge:

image
The Flowering Orchard, Vincent van Gogh 1888
image
Detail – The Flowering Orchard, Vincent van Gogh 1888
image
The Siesta, Paul Gauguin 1892-94
image
Still Life with Teapot and Fruit, Paul Gauguin 1896

What Rush Can Teach Writers About Relevance

I posted the article below a little over four years ago. It still rings true, even more so for me, after seeing Rush perform last week in Greensboro NC. The show covered 40 Years of music by three talented musicians who are also writers, composers and artists among their many passions.

What lessons can writers learn from Geddy, Alex and Neil?

  1. Always sound like yourself – then you’ll never sound dated.
  2. Life experiences hold a common thread that crosses generations.
  3. Your audience is smarter than you think – they’ll get the big ideas you’re trying to share. Give them something to think about.
  4. Explore your interests and collect experiences – this fills your creative well.
Rush R40, Greensboro NC
Lessons writers can learn from Rush. R40, Greensboro NC

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for the music.


 

RUSH, RELEVANCE & HENRY DAVID THOREAU

Be OriginalLast week, as I was driving home from my day job, I set my iPod to shuffle and settled into the flow of traffic. The Moody Blues “Forever Afternoon” was perfect for unwinding, a melodic story within the context of the album and still fresh after 43 years. The next song was BU2B by Rush, a song so new it’s not even on a disk yet by a band that’s been around since I was a kid. Wow.

I had one of those moments where a snatch of conversation from earlier in the day, the two songs playing adjacent and my own quest to find a place for my writing exploded into one word: relevance. What is the magic elixir that made classic musicians like the Moody Blues, Zeppelin and the Beatles survive the wearing away cynicism of time? How about Rush? Their music catalog is full of timeless songs and still their new music is fresh and well…  relevant. Trust me, I too feel some days “I’m ahead of the wheel and the next it’s rolling over me”. Really, “It’s just the kind of day to leave myself behind”.

See what I mean?

Certain emotions and human experiences remain the same no matter the year or generation. Tapping into that crosses time. Being original, being a leader at what you do will set you apart and make it hard to date your work. Techno pop had its day, but it sure sounds retro these days when I hear A Flock of Seagulls on the radio. The best compliment you get is how great your writing is, not how much your book is like so and so the famous author.

Keep in mind this is hard work. You have to dig deep to be original. However, as you pull in collective human experience, your plot and characters are becoming real, breathing elements for your readers. Your story will take on new turns and layered dimensions. Relevance cements the connection between you and your reader and in ten or twenty years you will still have a connection.

I’m now looking at my current work and thinking about how well I’ve layered my themes and character motivations. Will it be relevant in ten years? Have I created a unique voice for them?

I’m not sure if I could name one book that has stood the test of time for me, but there are many that I love to go back to on occasion to reread a passage. My favorite? That’s easy.

“I went to the woods because I wished to live deliberately...."

Time Stand Still

“Freeze this moment a little bit longer. Make each impression a little bit stronger.” ~ Rush

I love traveling and any place I visit is open game as a story setting. The tricky part is holding onto the details that once positioned into your story bring it to life for readers. Studies show that when you read sensory detail, the same part of your brain fires as though you are actually experiencing it. I think good writers have known this intuitively since storytelling began.

I use photos to jog my memory of the smells, sounds and feelings that add realism to my settings and characters. This first photo was taken from Notre Dame in Paris. In case you’re wondering, the buses and trailers belonged to the production crew for the TV series Highlander. Looking at this, I remember how incredibly cold it was. The wind blew along the river seeping through my coat and several layers of sweaters. The water smelled moins de frais as it swelled along the wall. I’m not sure if I realized at the time I would have a protagonist nearly drown in those waters, but I do recall wondering how long it would take to get hypothermia. Mystery writers just think that way.

The images and memories formed the basis for the setting of WIRED which begins and ends in Paris. I mentally returned to this location as I wrote the final scene which takes place on the bridge in the distance. Darker scenes descended into the catacombs and introduces another side of Paris usually not mentioned in the tour guides. For those locations, an article about a French police unit that patrols the underground provided the imagery.

The second photo is a church yard in England, but my memory is faulty on the exact location.  I’m thinking it may be in Suffolk. I do recall the church was well over 1,000 years old and was marred by medieval graffiti on the ancient floor tiles.  This will be in Enigma, the follow-up to WIRED.

These days I snap photos constantly with my phone. Many museums allow photos sans flash, although they don’t like when I take snaps of the security layout. My star character is an art thief and security expert; I’m only fictionally casing the art.

Photos freeze the moment long enough to share it with my characters. Build your setting and mood as an immersive experience that allows your readers to escape into the story.

DIY Book Marketing – Editorial Calendars

DIYBookMktg_ EditorialCalender_JudithGaines

Calendars have been around for thousands of years. We’ve used them since before kindergarten to track holidays and count birthdays, then graduated to day planners and mobile phones with pop-up reminders. We have no excuse for not knowing the day of the week and month and what we need to do. Calendars help us make order out of our busy lives.

This is what a Social Media Editorial Calendar can do for your DIY Book Marketing. It doesn’t have to be fancy or use special software – it just needs to be visual.

The visual nature of a calendar will help you see the bigger story build on each channel. It also takes the pressure off figuring out what to do next.

Slide1I’ve taken my editorial calendar a little further and added a few reference pages:

  • First, a quick reminder of what type of content works best on each channel, and image sizes and formats so I don’t have to keep looking them up.
  • And added some of the audience research so I’m always reminded of who I’m writing for and keep their interests in mind when planning topics. I’ve created Personas to help me put a face and personality to each Slide2audience segment. It’s easier to write to someone you know rather than a list of data.

Step One

Use your audience research to brainstorm topics and start a list. Free style it – no censoring – and let the craziest ideas have a place, because you never know which one will turn out to be brilliant. This is where I usually get excited and add something vague like “blue vs. yellow buttons” – I strongly recommend writing a few words so you know what it means six weeks later.

Once you have an idea of what you want to share, begin ranking them in a logical order. What would your reader need to know first for the next three topics to make sense? You see, as much as a single post is a story, the collection of posts become a larger story. Think episode, with each post building upon the next.

This example shows the weeks at the top and the channels to the side to give a weekly snapshot. A traditional calendar layout works well too.
This example shows the weeks at the top and the channels to the side to give a weekly snapshot. A traditional calendar layout works well too.

Step Two

Now you’re ready to add them to your calendar. Decide how frequently you want to post and on what channels and begin filling in a few weeks worth of content. Begin with the big stuff first – the articles and blog posts, putting them on the day you plan the content to publish.

Being able to see where you’re putting your content will help you spread out what you want to say and put it in the form that best fits a specific channel.

Should There Be a Post Every Day?

When you have a wonderful list of ideas, it’s easy to want to post a new topic every day. Slow down. You don’t need to talk to everyone on every channel everyday. As long as you post on a somewhat regular basis, readers will come, and you’ll have current blog followers stopping back in to see what’s new. Twitter is the only social channel that needs an every day feed, everything else gets its own schedule.

Tips

  • Avoid using the same content across all of your social media channels. Make variations that fit the audience and personality of each. The content should complement across channels, not be a copy. (1 topic = many short tweets or several Google+/Facebook updates)
  • Keep a consistent naming convention as you add content to your calendar so at a glance you know what’s coming up. For example: Blog-How to outline a short story; G+ meme on story plots. (Color coding works well too.)
  • Consider where you can use curated content so you’re not spending all of your writing time making social media content. Even Twitter, an admittedly a time-consuming channel, can be made manageable by using curated content tweets and a few pre-scheduled tweets to give you a 24-hour presence. Then when you are perusing your Twitter stream you can actually engage with friends and fans and not worry that the tweets promoting your blog posts and books are neglected.
  • Use themes to tie content together and help you generate ideas.

How Social Media Works

Have you ever been in the mall where you were constantly approached by someone with a sales pitch? How about that Sunday afternoon movie that was great until the 10-minute block of commercials? Not a good feeling. The reason the experience feels annoying is because you don’t have a relationship with the person pitching their products. Does this mean you build a social media relationship and then ask your new friends to buy your book?

Nope.

Building your audience on social media is about talking to people about common interests. Bring them something of value in exchange for their time. If they like your social posts, then they may click your profile and discover that you’re also a writer. If they like the type of books you write, then they may buy it.

Social Media doesn’t sell books directly. It’s getting to know people and creating opportunities for discoverability.

Last Word (I promise)

Editorial calendars can also be used to track your traditional book marketing.

  • Set a schedule of how many and how often you send queries to agents and publishers.
  • Schedule time for book signings and author events.
  • The best part — reward yourself with a day off just to write or attend a conference.

Your calendar is a visual of your writing life. Writing it down makes it easier to make it happen.

 

An Appointment That Can’t Be Broken

Tea Leaves and Writing
Harney & Sons Paris tea, Scrivener, Enigma Chapter 6. Jade enters a hidden vault in her father’s art gallery.

Whenever I have doubts about my sanity, I turn to the voices in my head to set things right. You might think I need medication, but the voices are the medication.

Writers know exactly what I’m talking about. Those voices that are always in the background wanting your undivided attention to tell their story. These are our characters, the fascinatingly flawed people who shape our fiction and helps us release tension, stress, anger, and a multitude of other emotions. Letting them run around on the page looks like work to those watching us at our keyboards, but for a writer…this is play time.

And if this is play time, it begs the question, “why is it so hard to get started?” To be able to dive in at any time, you need a writing habit. Kinda like having “the knack”, but instead of intuitive engineering, you’re building worlds out of words with ease.

Now, everyone has a habit. It makes you do a certain thing at a certain time a certain way. For writers and artists, establishing habits can help you get into the flow of your craft easier and faster. Just like you have your bedtime routine that tells your brain it’s time to sleep, and so like magic you begin to yawn as you put the toothbrush away, you can train your brain to enter writing mode. Establish a habit, a location, or trigger to tell your brain to write.

Do you write to music? A particular kind of music? Do you need silence? Where do you sit? Do you have toys on your desk, or must your writing software layout be just so? How do you warm up?

Make an appointment with yourself that you keep. Set aside an hour that is your writing time. If sixty minutes is too intimidating, start with fifteen and work your way up. Having a time limit will kick in your sense of urgency which has amazing powers to override the inner critic that slows you down. By keeping this appointment, you’re investing in yourself and your craft. You become a better writer through practice. Best selling authors aren’t blessed with magical orbs that feed the words to their fingers. They invest the time to write and write often to learn better ways to tell a story. No magic bullets, just work. This writing time, this investment in craft, trains your brain to quickly access the grey matter where your creativity lives.

Waiting for the perfect quiet day to write won’t put words on the paper for you. You have to make the time, and keep it to form the writing habits you want in your life. I envy writers who are able to turn out novels fast, and although my publication rate is sporadic, I do make time to write regularly. It’s how I process my thoughts, work out solutions to a multitude of tasks, and plan goals.

Today is an unusually chilly day for August, it’s rainy, the house is still, and my cup of Paris tea is the perfect temperature. A perfect setting to write, but I would be writing anyway. I’ve made an appointment that can’t be broken.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~

When you find a book you love, pass it along, tell a friend, tweet it, or share it on Facebook. This is how the great books are discovered.  Thanks.

Shameless self-promotion;)

Wired Judith Gaines

Wired by Judith Gaines

Amazon.com 4-Stars

Jade Weekes emerged from the oily wash of the Seine five years ago with no memory of her life, but an uncanny knowledge of fine art, museum security, and a knack for walking away with priceless treasures. Now she’s tracking an elusive Van Gogh with ties to an underworld struggle that will reveal her forgotten past. 

Jade Weekes leaves Paris to track a priceless Van Gogh from St. Pete to Chicago. Her contacts are shady and she is beginning to think there is more to this job than a buyer wanting a gift for his wife. Otherwise, why would Simon Morrell, a rival thief, cross her path just as the FBI begins asking questions? 

Caught up in the six billion dollar international art theft industry, she enlists help from unlikely sources: film actor Alex Ford, and veteran FBI specialists Stewart Connor and John Young.

How to Find Great Books by Indie Authors

Red PencilThere’s a plethora of great books on the market by Indie Authors, but in the growing e-book flood waters there are quite a few that are less than satisfying, and far from the professional product you are expecting for your investment (time & money).

Here’s my method for finding great books and discovering emerging writers.

Can you trust reviews?

Yes and no. It’s well-known that some reviews are planted to increase initial sales to get a book on a list or two, and boost its visibility. That doesn’t mean you can’t trust reviews, but you should look at the spread of ratings. Most books will have a distribution with the majority of ratings falling within a small range. These are likely the most trustworthy. I like to read the bad ones first, and it’s usually easy to spot the bitter, “this was not for me” or “not what I expected” reviews. Then I move on to those that fall in the mid range, and usually I get a good idea if the novel is something I want to try out.

If there are only a few reviews, and they are all five stars with glowing praise, that doesn’t mean it’s planted, but be cautious. That’s where this next item comes in handy.

Sample

If you’re not 100% sure, sample the book before you buy.

For authors reading this, a generous sample is more likely to lead to a happy customer than a tiny excerpt. Once a reader has invested the time to read a quarter of a novel and is hooked, they’ll come back and complete the purchase.

For readers, this is test drive time. Get a cup of peach tea, glass of wine, or coffee and kick back. Either you’re going to love the story and the writing, OR you’ll delete the sample from your library and move on. You may be out a little time, but not the few dollars you would have spent on that particular title. If you love it, you’ll have another great author to follow, and you’ll know when you buy their other titles, you will have constancy in quality and content.

Indie Reads

Here are a few titles that made me stay up way past my bed time. The plots and characters are engaging, and the quality of the presentation (clean copyediting & professional cover) was spot on.

Cyberstorm by Matthew Mather

Cyberstorm MatherDescription from Amazon

Sometimes the worst storms aren’t from Mother Nature, and sometimes the worst nightmares aren’t the ones in our heads. Mike Mitchell, an average New Yorker already struggling to keep his family together, suddenly finds himself fighting just to keep them alive when an increasingly bizarre string of disasters start appearing on the world’s news networks. As the world and cyberworld come crashing down, bending perception and reality, a monster snowstorm cuts New York off from the world, turning it into a wintry tomb where nothing is what it seems…

Review: Believable characters, combined with strong writing, provides enough realism to make you think this could happen today. Just when you think this is another end of the world story, it takes an abrupt turn. Not for squeamish types;)

Timebound by Rysa Walker

Time Bound WalkerDescription from Amazon

When Kate Pierce-Keller’s grandmother gives her a strange blue medallion and speaks of time travel, sixteen-year-old Kate assumes the old woman is delusional. But it all becomes horrifyingly real when a murder in the past destroys the foundation of Kate’s present-day life. Suddenly, that medallion is the only thing protecting Kate from blinking out of existence.

Kate learns that the 1893 killing is part of something much more sinister, and her genetic ability to time travel makes Kate the only one who can fix the future. Risking everything, she travels back in time to the Chicago World’s Fair to try to prevent the murder and the chain of events that follows.

Changing the timeline comes with a personal cost—if Kate succeeds, the boy she loves will have no memory of her existence. And regardless of her motives, does Kate have the right to manipulate the fate of the entire world?

Review: Time travel stories are always fun to read. Time Bound is inventive and well written, with just enough tension to keep the pages turning. This story would appeal to ages mid teens and above, with lots of room to imagine joining the cause to stop the Cyrists.

Time’s Echo by Rysa Walker

Times Echo WalkerDescription from Amazon

A Kindle exclusive novella, set in the world of Rysa Walker’s Timebound. 

Kiernan Dunne abandoned his family ties to help Kate fight the Cyrists, and he’s never regretted that for one moment. But he doesn’t understand why Kate can’t remember that night in 1893 Chicago, when she turned back to face the killer chasing them through the smoky corridors of the World’s Fair Hotel. Kate placed the CHRONOS key around his neck and made his eight year old self promise to wear it always, and that’s a promise Kiernan has never broken. 

When Kate suddenly vanishes after a Cyrist-engineered time shift, that hidden medallion is Kiernan’s only hope for finding her. He returns to the Cyrist fold to look for clues, but his search will lead him back to the question that has haunted him for years–what really happened after he left Kate at the World’s Fair Hotel?

Review: A quick read, and also a great follow-up to Time Bound, this can be considered a supplemental story to the series. Book two in the Chronos Files series is due out later in 2014.

Poe by J. Lincoln Fenn

Poe JLFennDescription from Amazon

It’s Halloween, and life is grim for twenty-three-year-old Dimitri Petrov. It’s the one-year anniversary of his parents’ deaths, he’s stuck on page one thousand of his Rasputin zombie novel, and he makes his living writing obituaries.

But things turn from bleak to terrifying when Dimitri gets a last-minute assignment to cover a séance at the reputedly haunted Aspinwall Mansion.

There, Dimitri meets Lisa, a punk-rock drummer he falls hard for. But just as he’s about to ask her out, he unwittingly unleashes malevolent forces, throwing him into a deadly mystery. When Dimitri wakes up, he is in the morgue—icy cold and haunted by a cryptic warning given by a tantalizing female spirit.

As town residents begin to turn up gruesomely murdered, Dimitri must play detective in his own story and unravel the connections among his family, the Aspinwall Mansion, the female spirit, and the secrets held in a pair of crumbling antiquarian books. If he doesn’t, it’s quite possible Lisa will be the next victim.

Review: This is a good old-fashioned ghost story with some interesting twists, and a few chills. The descriptive scenes bring the story to life, as you get to see the story unfold through Dimitri’s eyes. Lighter than Stephen King, this blends humor with suspense in a unique way.

~~~~~~~~~~~

When you find a great book, pass it along, tell a friend, tweet it, or share it on Facebook. This is how the  great books are discovered.  Thanks.

Shameless self-promotion;)

Wired Judith GainesDescription from Amazon

Jade Weekes emerged from the oily wash of the Seine five years ago with no memory of her life, but an uncanny knowledge of fine art, museum security, and a knack for walking away with priceless treasures. Now she’s tracking an elusive Van Gogh with ties to an underworld struggle that will reveal her forgotten past. 

Jade Weekes leaves Paris to track a priceless Van Gogh from St. Pete to Chicago. Her contacts are shady and she is beginning to think there is more to this job than a buyer wanting a gift for his wife. Otherwise, why would Simon Morrell, a rival thief, cross her path just as the FBI begins asking questions? 

Caught up in the six billion dollar international art theft industry, she enlists help from unlikely sources: film actor Alex Ford, and veteran FBI specialists Stewart Connor and John Young.

Art Lost – Art Recovered

The art work is famous, and even though you may have stood before it at some point in time, do you know its significance–what made it good enough to be hanging there? When a thief steps over the invisible line in a museum, the one the Docent politely asks you to observe, and snatches a painting, most of us are really seeing the artwork for the first time.

Often, art theft does not make headline news, but when it does, everyone stops to listen. The news shares vague crime details, and how many thousands, or millions of dollars the art work is worth, and at the same time spurs our imagination to fill in the details not shared.

It makes us wonder why we didn’t pay attention when we had the chance.

Below are few current news stories of art theft, art recovery, and the personal pain of art lost. From Dublin, to Virginia, to the French Riviera, each article feels like a jumping point for a compelling story. It’s no wonder art crime is romanticized, but in reality it funds darker, criminal activity as part of a $6 Billion industry.

 

Click images below to read the full articles.

Riviera Heist
Suspected mastermind of Riviera art theft says FBI framed him
Dublin Painting Returned
Painting returned to Dublin gallery 20 years after theft
Ponytail Theif
Contemporary art thief with a ponytail
India Artifacts
Federal agents go on the hunt for stolen treasures

 

 

Enigma

January has a way of making everything new. A crisp calendar, a brand new notebook, and a post holiday purge of leftover candy paves the way for fresh creative endeavors.

To kick off the new year, here’s an excerpt from Enigma, the next installment in the Jade Weekes Art Mystery series.

Enjoy.

The Future Man | Paul Klee | 1933
The Future Man | Paul Klee | 1933

Enigma, A Jade Weekes Art Mystery

Chapter One

The boat rocked in long swells which Jade felt roll from left to right, like a book she’d read enough times to memorize. It felt like Andre’s barge floating on the oily wash of the Seine, but it wasn’t. The damn sun was too hot for one, and the calming cacophony of the Paris waterfront was an ocean away.

“How much time are you planning to waste in that chair?”

She turned her eyes in the direction of the voice, John Young stood at the rail, hands on hips. “I don’t have a job,” she said, closing her eyes again.

He crossed the narrow wood deck and stood over her a moment before pulling a lounge chair closer and sitting. “It’s been over a year,” he said. “The statute of limitations is up on self-pity.” The chair squeaked under his weight as he settled back.

“Who let you on the dock?” she asked, “I’ll need to reprimand security.”

“Andre called and…”

“And wanted you to check on me,” she finished. “I’m happy, tell him that. Now go away.”

“Your father is dead, you can’t bring him back. Andre is alive, thanks to you.”

Jade sat up. Her skin felt tight, like leather tanned and stretched to dry. She had intentionally moved as far away as she could from the memories, and half remembered images of her past, spending months building up walls. An interruption was unneeded, unwanted. Her pulse thumped in her throat. “Whatever you want, I’m not interested.”

Her only comfort zone was now out of her reach. For five years she had walked into galleries, skirted security systems and guards, and walked out with Reniors. It had felt like a normal life to her, normal enough to black out all memories hidden from her by retrograde amnesia, a side effect of being attacked and left for dead, floating in the Seine. Certainly, if you have something to live for, it doesn’t get washed so easily from your mind, she thought. The temporal vacancy was home.

The only image she had of her life before the attack, was of her father laying on the floor, his blood painting the gray tiles of their small Chicago gallery. Even as she’d tried to not remember, it came back when the same madman, Jarvinen, had tried to kill Andre, the mentor who had taught her a use for her unusual skill set. He was like her second father—for a while at least.

Young shifted beside her. She glanced to her right. His legs stretched to the end of the lounge chair, and he had pulled a Braves baseball cap over his eyes.

“Suit yourself,” she said.

“I will,” he replied.

Jade closed her eyes, trying to block out his presence. Water lapped at the dock pilings, and further down, she heard a boat crew yelling to one another as they off loaded a fishing party. Young made no sound, and after a while she began to think he’d either left, or perhaps fallen asleep. She glanced at the chair. He was still there. Lean and tan, clad in tan cargo shorts and a Jimmy Buffett t-shirt, he fit into the surroundings. It was a marked improvement over the mud and blood crusted jacket and jeans he’d worn when they had exited the sewers of Paris. He reminded her of unfinished business.

“What have you heard of Morrell?” she asked. Simon Morrell, a career art thief, con man, and murderer with no moral compass, lived adrift in the money currents offered by organized crime. Last year, when his plans countered Jade’s, she’d helped the police capture him with solid evidence to put him away for life.

Unfortunately, he had quickly disappeared—as was his habit—during a custody exchange.

“There’s an occasional lead, but nothing turns up,” said Young. “I think someone in the ranks is helping him, but so far I don’t know who.”

“Is he in Europe or the States?”

Young smiled. “Both, but I’m always a step behind,” he said.

“With Morrell, you can’t follow leads, you have to figure out what he wants, and get to it first,” said Jade.

“Is that so?”

She stood up and wrapped a large dark towel around her waist. The contrast of the terry fabric against her tanned skin, drew Young’s eyes upward until they met hers, and he looked away, pulling his hat back in place.

“Why are you here, John?”

“Andre, forever in need of something to occupy his time, discovered a trail that may lead to a lost painting. You know how he can’t resist a challenge,” drifted Young’s voice from under his hat brim. He seemed to sink deeper into the chair. “He thinks you can find it.”

Jade walked to boat cabin and pulled a cooler from under a bench. After sloshing through watered down ice, she returned with two dripping glass bottles, and held one over Young’s head. “Here,” she said.

He took the beer from her hand, and twisted off the cap. “Thanks.”

“Per my agreement with the French, British, and United States legal systems, I don’t find paintings anymore, but thanks for thinking of me.” She took a sip of her beer and sat. “Is Morrell involved?”

Young shook his head. “Not this one, it’s an old case, and a lot of years and people have done their damnedest to erase the trail. Just thought you might be bored hiding out, waiting for the rest of your life to happen. You can use your unique talents for something better.”

“What’s the catch?”

“It’s just a story, a few old letters,” he said. “And this.” He reached into his back pocket, then held an envelope out. “Take it.”

She paused, looking at it, recognizing the stationery from Andre’s desk. She could almost see the barge rocking on the currents of the river, beneath the shadows of Notre Dame. She took her time reaching for, it and pulled the envelope his from his fingers. The flap was partially glued from the humid air, and she slipped her finger under the edge to flip it open. A small black and white photograph with scalloped white edges, and the brown spots that come to old paper with age, slid into her fingers. A girl stared back at her, dark hair pulled back into a bun of some kind, with wild curls, breaking loose, suspended around her face. She wore a jacket and white blouse, and stood in the formal posture people took decades ago when posing for a picture.

“Who is she?” asked Jade.

“Keep looking,” Young replied.

The photo revealed little detail. The setting appeared to be in a home, a lace curtain peeked along the edge of the image, and a painting hung in the background. The girl seemed familiar, but Jade couldn’t pick any feature to connect a name or memory. “I’m sure I’ve never seen her, but there’s something about her… where and when was this taken?” she asked, flipping it over to scan the back.

“Dessau, Germany, 1938.”

Jade looked over at Young. “Name?”

“Look again,” he replied with a nod towards the photo. “I’m sure your father told you stories about her.” He paused to take a hit off his beer. “There was a reason he became an art collector and opened the gallery. If you haven’t remembered yet, I would think you’d want to look up your family.”

She let out a breath, “Family?” She slipped the photo into the envelope and tossed it onto his chest. “I don’t know the person I used to be, why would I waste time on a family tree?”

Young sat up, placing his bottle on the deck under the chair. He slid the photo from the envelope, and held it next to her face. “It’s the eyes and mouth that you find familiar,” he said, staring at her past its curved edge, his gaze challenging.

She looked at him, then at the deck over his shoulder, and then down at her beer bottle without answering.

“Why do you think that is?” he asked.

“You can hardly wait to tell me. I don’t know whether to be interested or annoyed.”

“You’re interested,” he replied in a softer tone. “You recognized her because her face looks a lot like yours.” He flipped the photo around so the image gazed at her.

Jade looked at the girl. She reached up and covered part of the image so only the eyes looked back. “Family photo?” she whispered.

“Your grandmother, Anna Blume.”

In the distance, a jet ski chopped over water sending its wake crashing. Suddenly, every sound seemed magnified, the shouts from the deck hands, and whistle calls from the seagulls competed for her attention. What had stumped her before, now was obvious. “Anna Blume.” She said the name, wondering if she’d said at another time in her life, perhaps before her memories were scrambled. The sound of the letters felt foreign.

“Anna left Germany shortly after this picture was taken. She was with her father, Jacob Werner, but somewhere along the way, they were separated.”

“My father was named after him,” she said. “Why is this important now? I’m sure she’s long dead.”

“She had a painting with her. She and her father, were running from the Nazi occupation when the train they were on was detained. Werner was taken away by German soldiers, but Anna hid with a group of women. She left the country, at least that’s what we believe. The history gets sketchy after that.”

“Wait a minute,” said Jade. “If you don’t know what happened to her, then how do you know she’s my grandmother? This sounds like some bullshit that you and Andre cooked up.”

“Why would we cook anything up? If you want to stay on this boat the rest of your life, I don’t care, but…” he paused with dramatic effect. “If we find out what happened to her, we find this.” He tapped the corner of the photo.

She looked at the eyes and face of Anna Blume, and then turned her attention to the painting hanging on the wall behind her shoulder. “I need a closer look,” she said.

Jade left him on the deck while she rummaged through the cabin. When she returned, she had a small domed magnifier. She laid the photo on the arm of the chair and covered it with the glass. The painting curved upward, exaggerating the lines of the geometric patterns that crossed over the face…no, she thought, it was two faces staring at her. “Paul Klee.”

“That’s what we’re looking for,” he said.

“He was one of the artists deemed degenerate by Hitler.” She moved the dome along the image to take in more detail. “He was too modern and bold with his vision to fit into the Führer’s art horde.”

“You know a lot about art from that period?” he asked.

“You never answered my question. How do you know this woman is my grandmother?”

Young paused, collecting his thoughts before answering. “You really don’t remember any of this?” He turned the photo to get a better view through the magnifier. “After Anna fled Germany, we traced her to France.”

“We? How are you in this?”

“I have an extensive file on you and your father. Naturally, when I found a mystery in his past, I couldn’t resist looking closer. It fit Andre’s story,” he said, rubbing his hands together to remove the water that had dripped from his beer bottle. “I shared it with Andre because he knows the shadier sides of the European art market better than anyone. If this painting had been seen in the last seventy-five years, he would know.”

“You said there were letters.”

Young pulled a pack of papers from his shorts pocket and unfolded them before handing them over. “These are photocopies of letters Anna wrote to her husband before she disappeared. She left Germany, ending up in France where she married, and had your dad. The painting she smuggled out of Germany is worth around sixty-million euros. The story says she left her family to take the painting to a museum on the German border to sell. They were struggling for food and basics everywhere in France at the time. She never came back. The painting didn’t surface, and when her husband looked for her, he found out she had never arrived.”

“So she never surfaced,” said Jade, “and neither did the painting.” She pulled the papers apart, looking at the delicate script handwriting.

“The last page is our clue. It’s the last communication she had with her family. The painting was the only thing of value she had when they left Germany.”

“So, if I find the Klee, its mine, right?”

“That’s not so clear,” he said, “and you know it. This photo is the only proof of ownership.”

“And the stories and letters?”

“Only a bill of sale will stand up in court, especially on a case this old.” He shrugged. “Even if we find it, it may take years to clear ownership.”

“I see what you’re doing.” She shoved the papers and photo into the envelope and handed it over. “Believe me, I appreciate your concern, but I don’t need a diversion. I’m happy to hang on my boat and stay out of jail. You’re the last person who should be getting me involved on an art hunt.”

“You’re the last person who should be wasting their intelligence bobbing on this waterway.” He downed the last of his beer and pitched the bottle into a bucket beside the deck rail with a harsh clatter just short of shattering.

“What if I could guarantee you’re on the right side of the law. You won’t be arrested,” he added.

“I recall that line,” she replied, “just before my court appearance.”

“You never had jail time. I made the case that you helped take down Jarvinen’s gang which solved a murder case and a string of heists.” He paused and looked toward the cooler. “You have another beer in there?”

“Help yourself.”

He pulled the cooler open and grabbed two more bottles. “This is your mystery to solve. It’s your prize to win.”

“I keep the Klee?”

“You connect the dots for your past.” He passed the beer to her. “You’re hiding, trying to keep yourself from remembering who you were before you lost your memory. I’m suggesting you face it head on.” He pointed his beer toward her. “You’re not Jane Werner, or Jade Weekes.” He tapped his bottle against hers, “You need to figure out who you’re going to be today.”

She popped the cap off the beer and let it bounce under the chair. “If I help you, I want the painting.”

“I’ll do what I can,” he said. “Are you in?”

“What’s in it for you and Andre?”

Young smiled, “This is strictly for fun.”

“Doesn’t it go against your job with the FBI?” she asked.

“The job is gone. I spent too many years living with the worst kind of people and seeing them walk on a technicality. It was time to retire.”

He stretched out on the chair, and Jade realized how much he had changed, aside from the clothing. The lines that had cut into his brow were softer, and he was relaxed. There was little sign of the John Young that had guided her through the Paris underground, ready to react to attack, and ready to kill if needed.

“How long have you been out?”

“A few months. It’s a nice pension too. I’m getting used to waking up knowing someone isn’t trying to kill me.”

“I’m flattered you trust me,” she said. “But I’m not interested.”

Young smiled, but the expression didn’t reach all of this face. He let out a long breath, “Andre said you’d say no. Aren’t you at least a little curious to know what happened to Anna and the Klee?”

“I don’t know Anna, or the line of descendants you think leads to me. You and Andre know enough to move on without me.” She stood and walked to the deck rail facing the dock. “I’d like you to leave.”

Young stared at her, seeming to weigh if her request was genuine, and then walked to the rail. He adjusted his cap to shade his eyes, and stepped onto the dock. “Let me know if you change your mind.”

She watched him walk the weather washed boards until he disappeared into the parking lot. The whole idea that she’d jump at the chance to find a painting, or even search through her family history to satisfy Andre’s whims infuriated her. John was ex FBI, and with the deep undercover stretch he did with Andre, his art world connections were shadier than Morrell’s.

A shadow of guilt tinged her anger. She wouldn’t have found Andre in the labyrinth of catacombs beneath Paris without John’s connections. His cover had been deep enough to burn his relationship with most of his FBI colleagues, who believed he’d turned to the other side of the game. Was he really retired, or had he been forced out of the bureau? She could call Stewart Connor with the Boston FBI office and ask, but that would mean she cared if his story were true—that would mean she was actually considering taking up the challenge. Stewart was John’s only friend left at the FBI, and had tracked her and Morrell to Jarvinen. What were the chances even he would know John’s official status, or would it be more closed files, locked out of his security clearance?

“Damn it!” Why can’t I just stay out of it? She turned and noticed the pack of papers and photos on the chair. John was leaving bait, she thought.

She grabbed the pages and marched to the rail with the intention of throwing them over, but her fingers wouldn’t let go. This is all be fiction, she thought. It’s easy to fake letters and photos. She held them over the water again, but her own eyes stared back at her from the grainy image, and again, she hesitated.

Inside the cabin, her cell phone rang. After the fourth ring, it stopped and was followed by a chirp of a text message.

She tossed the papers onto the chair, reached in the door, and grabbed the phone off the counter.

“Why this painting? Why Blume?” the text read. The number was unfamiliar, and Jade was sure it would lead to a pay as you go phone with no account records. She typed and hit send. “Who is this?”.

The reply came quick, “Find me.”

She stared at the text message, her mind reeling over the possibilities. Morrell? Young? Andre? “I’m not playing your game,” she typed. There was no answer, and after a moment she set the phone down.

It was a good questions. Why now? Why this hunt?

She grabbed a backpack and shoved in a change of clothes and a toothbrush. When she emerged at the end of the dock, Young was sitting on the hood of a black SUV, eating a hot dog. He didn’t seem surprised to see her.

Jade cocked her head, resisting the comment she wanted to make. Instead, she said, “If I help you, I want the painting, and I call the plays. I’ve spent years building connections to information, and to people who know how to make transactions happen. I’m not going to risk that.”

“I thought you were out of the business.”

“Some skills translate to other career paths.” She opened the car door and tossed her pack into the floorboards.

“That’s all you need to know.”

“First steps?” he asked, throwing the food wrapper into a trash can. He opened the driver’s door and slid in.

“We go to Chicago.”

“To your father’s old apartment?” he asked.

She nodded, “Jacob had a storeroom full of boxes with family papers, photos…things passed down. It’s the logical place to start piecing together the story.”

“Will you be calling on old friends?” he asked.

“Alex Ford, you mean?” Alex, an action-figure of a movie star, had helped to track her father’s killer to Paris, and had risked his own life to save hers. All that, after she had broken into his house with the intention of plundering his art collection. “He’s in London working on a project. He’ll be gone another month, at least.”

“So you’re still an item.”

She shook her head, “We were never an item. We just play chess sometimes.”

“Is that an euphemism?”

She gave a shrug, “I think your job for now is to drive.”

~~~~~~~~~~~

Paul Klee
Paul Klee was a German-Swiss painter and draftsman who’s artistic influence survives in modern graphic design and typography. His exploration of styles and mediums defied classification, taking in elements of Impressionism, Cubism, Surrealism, and Abstraction. This was enough for Hitler and his Reich Marshals to deem his work subversive. Klee’s paintings were part of the degenerate art exhibition, Die Ausstellung “Entartete Kunst” in Munich, November 1937.

Layer by Layer Character Development

Layer x layerThere was a time when I read a lot of books on the craft of writing fiction. Today, I find the most insightful character development tips coming from psychology professors. We’re all a collection of layers made up of personal history, family, emotions, and unique experiences. If characters are developed with just one or two of these layers, then as writers, we miss the opportunity to make them feel real for our readers.

A few weeks ago I discovered a video in my weekly Pinterest update which uses forced perspective to illustrate the difference between assumption and reality. This led me to author and psychologist Richard Wiseman. His book Did You Spot The Gorilla? also talks about perception. I’ll let you read the book description yourself and instead focus on how I relate this to writing. How often are you so focused on getting your plot moving, and getting your characters from point A to point B that you miss opportunities to show character depth? This isn’t a wordy side trip for the sake of showing the character in gratuitous situations. This is an opportunity to develop a sub plot—you know the other problem your character has to figure out, that parallels the main theme or plot. No one has a single focus in life, including our characters. What did you do today? Now what was going on in the back of your mind during this time? Characters also have inner dialogue and multiple tasks to juggle.

In Wired, Jade Weekes is trying to figure out why she’s been sent to steal a painting that is a forgery while at the same time piecing together lost memories washed from her mind when she was attacked on a Paris bridge. In the end, one problem is linked to the other furthering the plot, and adding a layer to her complex personality.

Understanding why we behave the way we do, and what motivates us can be helpful in creating characters who move the plot forward using a fully developed personality. In 59 Seconds, Wiseman talks about practical phycology we can use to improve our lives. I see this as a gold mine for character behavior and aligning their actions to their motives.

Below is a short list of books I’ve found insightful and also fun to read. Please leave a comment and share your favorite recommendations.

Did You Spot The Gorilla? Richard Wiseman
59 Seconds: Think A Little Change A Lot Richard Wiseman
Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking Susan Cain (related post)

Wired for the Weekend

A Jade Weekes Art Mystery
A Jade Weekes Art Mystery

Wired went live on Smashwords in the early hours of March 15th, and is already flying off the virtual shelves. It’s available for Free through March 29th as I tweak the formatting, cover image, and promo copy. While there are a lot of moving parts to coordinate for the official launch, I’m excited to finally have it available, and look forward to feedback from readers.

Wired is the first installment of the Jade Weekes Art Mystery series, with the 2nd novel, Enigma, scheduled for release late 2013. Set in Paris, St. Pete, and Chicago, this mystery unravels an organized crime gang, solves a murder, and reveals the haunting past of main character, Jade Weekes.

Here’s the promo copy from Smashwords:

Short description
Read for FREE through March 29, 2013! Jade Weekes emerged from the oily wash of the Seine five years ago with no memory of her life, but an uncanny knowledge of fine art, museum security, and a knack for walking away with priceless treasures. Now she’s tracking an elusive Van Gogh with ties to an underworld struggle that will reveal her forgotten past.

Extended description
Jade Weekes leaves Paris to track a priceless Van Gogh from St. Pete to Chicago. Her contacts are shady and she is beginning to think there is more to this job than a buyer wanting a gift for his wife. Otherwise, why would Simon Morrell, a rival thief, cross her path just as the FBI begins asking questions?

Caught up in the six billion dollar international art theft industry, she enlists help from unlikely sources: film actor Alex Ford, and veteran FBI specialists Stewart Connor and John Young.

No one is who they seem, most of all Jade Weekes.

You can download Wired for your e-reader here.

The Red PencilLook for me to return to blogging on a regular basis as I vet ideas for novel number 3 in the series (working title The Missing), and ramble on techniques for character development. Enjoy your weekend, and get outside to soak up the extra sunshine. 😉